Tag Archives: Lars Hesselboe

BBC4 …Borgen is back for Season 3.

24 Nov

Some men change their party for the sake of their principles… others their principles for the sake of their party.

The much lauded Danish political thriller Borgen is back on BBC4 for a third season. When we left the denizens of Christiansborg last season Birgitte Nyborg (“Sidse Babett Knudsen“) was a woman on the verge of a complete breakdown. Her personal life was in tatters, her was daughter fighting depression and her political career was in turmoil. The season ended with Birgitte giving a Churchillian speech as she leads her troops into a general election.

In Season 3 we rejoin Borgen two and a half years on. Birgitte has lost power, she has left the political arena and is now a well-paid speaker in business circles sitting on several boards, and is no longer leader of the party.

The other characters in Borgen have all gone through Major life changes. Kasper Juul (“Pilou Asbæk“) and Katrine Fønsmark (“Birgitte Hjort Sørensen“) moved in together, had baby and have now split up. Lars Hesselboe (“Søren Spanning“), leader of the Liberal Party is now the Prime Minister in coalition with the Moderates.

Birgitte may have left politics but Politics hasn’t left her. Her mentor and close political associates Bent Sejrø (“Lars Knutzon“) worries about the direction the Moderate Party is drifting away from its centrist political ideology as it supports the right wing Liberal party in government.

Birgitte is eventually convinced to stage a comeback and fight for the leadership of the Moderate Party, she does and loses, and is now left with only one choice if she wishes to remain relevant in politics, form her own Political Party.

This sets the tone for the Season 3, the emergence of her new Party the New Democrats. A party made entirely in her image and further step in the evolution of Birgitte from a woman who wanted to change politics to a woman who is changing politics to suit her personal ambition.

BBC4…Nordic Noir TV Fans..Borgen is back for Season 2

5 Jan

It is the depths of winter, the days are short and the nights long, what better time for our seasonal dip in the latest dark haunting drama from Scandinavia. Season 2 of Borgen is back on BBC4 on Saturdays at 9pm.

If you loved ‘The Killing’ (Forbrydelsen) couldn’t wait for your daily fix of ‘The Bridge’ (Broen) and find ‘Wallander’ unmissable then your are almost already a fan of ‘Borgen’. For those who aren’t here is a quick synospis of Season 1 from wikipedia.

With Danish elections to begin soon, Birgitte Nyborg, leader of the Moderate Party is interviewed by Katrine Fønsmark, a journalist for the broadcaster TV1. Both women are unknowingly connected by Nyborg’s media advisor, Kasper Juul, who is also Katrine’s ex-boyfriend. Katrine has been having an affair with Ole Dahl, the communications chief for Prime Minister Lars Hesselboe.

When Dahl dies of a heart attack whilst in bed with Katrine, she panics and contacts Kasper for help. While removing evidence from Dahl’s flat, Kasper comes across sales receipts showing that Hesselboe has made expensive personal purchases using his official credit card. He offers these to Nyborg as a possible bargaining chip for use in the upcoming general election. When Nyborg declines, Kasper gives it to opposition leader Michael Laugesen. After Laugesen reveals the information in a television debate, Nyborg deduces the source and fires Kasper.

Laugesen’s action backfires, however, and many voters reject both him and Hesselboe in favour of the minority parties, including the Moderates. This puts Nyborg in the running for prime minister, a development even she didn’t expect. Although the obvious choice for the office, Nyborg faces condescension and chauvinism from other party leaders, but is buoyed up by the support of her deputy, Bent Sejrø.

Laugesen refuses to support her as leader of a coalition government, but is undermined by his own resentful colleagues, who leak information that leads to his own resignation as party leader. With delicate navigation Nyborg is thus able to form a centre-left coalition government with the Labour and Green Parties, along with support from the far-left Solidarity Party. Laugesen is appointed head of the Ekspres tabloid newspaper, and uses his new position to become the government’s fiercest critic.

Nyborg continues to rely on Bent and her husband Philip for help making her premiership a success. She appoints a new P.R. assistant to replace Kasper, but he quickly proves disastrous during a TV interview with Laugesen. Nyborg re-hires Kasper, who is still troubled by his break-up with Katrine. Kasper learns from Katrine that she became pregnant by Dahl and had an abortion, becoming heartbroken when she begins a short relationship with her fitness instructor. He faces more problems when Laugesen writes a memoir revealing details about the personal lives of several politicians, including Kasper’s role in exposing Hesselboe’s receipts. Katrine realises that he took them from Dahl’s apartment and angrily confronts him.

Nyborg and Kasper manipulate the facts and dismiss Laugesen’s book as “gossip”.
As the parliament prepares to convene, Kasper struggles to write Nyborg’s opening speech. He half-heartedly flirts with Nyborg’s personal secretary, Sanne, who loses her job as a result. Meanwhile, Philip, unhappy with his own position, finally loses faith in his marriage with Nyborg when he is forced to resign as the CEO of a major electronics company to avoid a conflict of interest; he begins an affair with a recruitment consultant. Nyborg attempts to disguise their marital crisis by agreeing to a television documentary about her official and personal life, but calls it off when Philip, unable to stand the subterfuge, insists on a divorce. Katrine, learning that Kasper has obtained editorial control over the programme, resigns from her job with at TV1.

A poor showing in the polls results in Nyborg’s Labour allies approaching her to get a bigger share of Cabinet seats. They focus on Bent, who is obliged to resign as finance minister to make room for a Labour politician. Nyborg’s opening speech is a resounding success, but she is close to an emotional breakdown as the season ends.

The Bridge is in my opinion lighter than its compatriots being as it is focused on the politics, but it does have so fairly heavy emotional moments and definitely worth a watch.